Mane Clipping Schedule

Females/Spanish Mares

At Birth Clip and shape the mane. Clip all hair from the tail. Shave forelock. 

Yearling Clip and shape the mane. Clip all hair from the tail. Shave forelock. 

Late yearling Allow the forelock to grow. Clip and shape the mane. Tail is allowed to start growing. Keep the upper part of the tail shaved. Bang the lower part of the tail.

Two years old Clip and shape the mane. Forelock is natural. Keep the upper part of the tail shaved. Bang the lower part of the tail. 

Three years old and up Continue to clip as previously described.

picture of andalusian horse  picture of andalusian mare

Males/Spanish Stallions

At Birth Clip and shape the mane. Clip all hair from the tail. Shave forelock. 
Yearling Clip and shape the mane. Clip all hair from the tail. Shave forelock. 
Late yearling* Mane and tail are allowed to start growing
Two years old Mane and tail are not clipped
Three years old and up Mane and tail are not clipped

How to Keep Your Horse Looking Its Best

If you are planning on showing the horse late fall of its yearling year (our National show is in October) keep the mane and tail clipped until after the show. Then let the mane, tail, and forelock grow out over the winter while the horse is in hiding!

Once you’ve started clipping your fillies and mares, plan on clipping them at least every month. A “tune-up” can be done at any time to clip off stray haris and make the mane and tail look neater.

Equipment You Will Need

Large Animal Clippers: The best equipment for shearing the mane and tail is a good set of Oster large animal clippers and several large pairs of sharp scissors. It is possible to shear the mane using only scissors. I knew a patrol officer who was able to get a beautiful roach on his horse only using scissors. But most Andalusian horses have a very thick and tough mane– so the heavy-duty clippers are really the best solution. If you try using smaller clippers such as the ones used to trim ears, your mane will look choppy and not very pretty. Beg or borrow, but get the large clippers. They are a good investment and will last a long time if you take care of them. Large clippers are also great for body clipping. Keep a spare set of blades around and some type of lubricant.

picture of scissors

A Place to Clip: In addition to your clipping equipment, you’ll need a place to clip the horse. This is preferably out of the wind. The best solution is to put the horse in “stocks” - the type that veterinarians use. This is the safest way since the horse can’t kick you if you’re behind the stocks. Place some food in a bucket to keep the horse occupied while you shave the bulk of the hair off. This will also help get the horse accustomed to the clipping and make it a positive experience for them. Foals can be put in a stock next to their mothers. Or if they are halter broke, tie them next to their mother to be clipped. The mare must stand still and provide a good example for her baby. Be careful if you put the horse in crossties since these can be dangerous if the horse becomes scared of the clippers

A Twitch for Uncooperative Horses: Another good item to have on hand is a twitch. Some horses, especially young mares, dislike the feeling of the clippers on their mane and will throw their head around or twitch their skin. When you’re putting the final touches on the shaped mane it’s very important that the horse is standing still. This is when the twitch comes in handy. There are basically two types of twitches, a wooden handle with a chain or rope loop that requires a person to keep it twisted and a metal twitch that locks down on itself allowing you to have your hands free. It’s good to keep one of each around. When approaching the horse to apply the twitch, rub the horse’s nose vigorously until he stops overreacting. Quickly place the twitch on. After you’re finished and you remove the twitch, rub the horse’s nose again with your hand. He’ll probably be a little perturbed and move his head away. Be persistent until he allows you to handle his muzzle again. This type of training will prevent the horse from becoming “twitch shy” in the future.

List of Equipment Needed for Clipping

Here is a list of the equipment you’ll need. I’ve included items that will also allow you to shave whiskers and ears.

Large clippers (for mane and tail)
Medium clippers (for ears and face)
Disposable shavers (for whiskers on sensitive horses)
Twitch
Stocks, cross ties, or safe place to work the horse
Halter and strong lead rope
Large scissors
Clipper oil

Templates in Time